Samadhi

Luciano Regoli and Nanni Civitenga became part of Samadhi, a group full of eminent musicians such as Stefano Sabatini (ex-Free Love; while he was part of Samadhi, he founded a band named Kaleidon), Ruggero Stefani (ex-Fholks and L’Uovo di Colombo), Aldo Bellanova (ex-Teoremi) and two members respectively named Sandro Conti (drums) and Stevo Saradzic (flutist and performer, but also an orchestral director). The band abandoned the visceral sacredness of urban and progressive rock, popular in the early ‘70s, and sewed a fine album, with dreamy tones, iridescent jazz sounds, and Regoli’s voice adapted and amalgamated to those difficult elegant avant-garde music rites, whose lyrics were taken from the book of poems “…fiori di ieri… fiori di domani” written by writer and stage actor Enrico Lazzareschi. The poems intertwined with the wise shapes of Sabatini’s fusion keyboards, as well as the high evocative power of of Sandro and Aldo Conti Bellanova’s rhythmic instances supported Nanni Civitenga’s acoustic and electric arpeggios.
We could consider Samadhi a real ‘supergroup’, a very tight ensemble that headed for high avant-garde sonic shores. The two authors’ (Bellanova-Sabatini) favourite music branches dug deeper into the jazz-rock legacy that was taking his foot in those years in Italy. Keyboards at full blast, Luciano Regoli’s voice modulations and his high-pitched singing in “L’ultima spiaggia” where his long vocalize enriches the track, turned that LP into a pearl, unfortunately lost in an ocean doomed to destruction. The wind instruments parts acted brilliantly in the dream space of a yet too short journey. The 33rpm was released in 1974 on Fonit Cetra, but the record label preferred to focus their attention to a new band called Uno, formed by ex-Osanna members (Elio D’Anna and Danilo Rustici).
The beautiful “Samadhi” went unnoticed even if you could draw valid Mediterranean music patterns from it, far away from foreign standards. Without any external support, the band soon dissolved. After that, Luciano Regoli was contacted by Il Rovescio della Medaglia and Goblin, but eventually refused, tired of the business surrounding his life and, as a free spirit, he retired at the Elba Island, where he devoted himself to painting.

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